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Category Archives: Media Commentary

Really, the picture says it all. As the Patent Wars continue to make me Always Grumpy, the Apple seems to have the Little Green Man by a very sensitive part of his anatomy while Windows is just background. On careful inspection you can see that this makes the Android very sad. Yes, my colleague Simon and I were busy at our desks again!

 


With the great reviews BB10 is getting (see here in IT World Canada and here in The Register), maybe we need to add a fourth ecosystem to our little dioramas.

Jonathan Gladstone is alwaysgrumpy at jbglad59@sympatico.ca or follow me on Twitter @jbglad59.

Back in April I wrote a post about What Googorola Needs. At the time, I suggested they needed an Android Accelerator, which a colleague of mine and I designed and photographed. They never took us up on our offer to sell our device, and by June it had become obvious that they needed more. Commentators were observing some of the reasons that development of apps for iOS had continued to outpace that for Android: see this article in IT World Canada, for example. In a fit of premonition between bouts of throwing small objects at one another, my colleague Simon and I repurposed the parts of the Android Accelerator. Since then, the events of the Patent Wars have made it obvious that Googorola’s little man is locked in an Android Prison, pictured here:

Poor little green man!

The Patent Wars. Ah, now that makes me Always Grumpy! Read More »

That’s “ineffectual communications”… if you use your spell-checker and maybe, just maybe, engage your brain.

Earlier this week I rejected a document at work. I rejected it because the grammar and syntax, the spelling, the punctuation and the general composition were so poor that I had to struggle to guess what the writer meant. So what am I, someone’s fourth-grade teacher? No, I’m just Always Grumpy.

That’s right, it’s me; I’m back after a long summer hiatus: Frequently Happy, Sometimes Sneezy, Often Dopey, Rarely Bashful and always, Always Grumpy.

As a cube-dweller in a sometimes sensitive position in a large corporate environment, I review documents all the time. I reject them when I feel I need to. When I do, it slows people down, delays their projects and makes them work harder. Read More »

Every now and then I run out of things to say. (Really, I do!) But when I want to keep up with the news or I need inspiration or sometimes just a break, I usually go to the interwebs. I’ve gotten pickier over the years, and the interwebs have changed. At many sites, the articles you see are barely even teasers. At those sites you don’t get any real content unless you pay for it either by sending dollars or by receiving ads. Those sites make me Always Grumpy, so I won’t tell you about them. But these sites on the interwebs make me Frequently Happy instead: I can usually go to them and learn something or crack a smile or both :-). I’ll start with I/T sites and move on to other stuff:   Read More »

Sometimes I have trouble keeping up with the world of IT. The constantly changing technology makes me Frequently Happy, Very Surprised and Always Grumpy… sometimes all at once, which is more than a little confusing!

Take this article from ZDNet UK, which is one of my favourite sources for fairly straight-up news and reasonably unbiased analysis of all things IT. Deprinting? What on earth is that? And why?

It turns out that deprinting is laser-based technology by means of which one can remove baked-on laser toner from printed pages. And it’s being touted as “environmental” or “green” technology because it could allow people to re-use sheets of paper up to two or three times. Really?!? Come on now.
Read More »

In spite of being Always Grumpy, I’m sometimes very lucky. In the cube farm where I work, I have the great good fortune to have wonderful neighbours, and it makes me Frequently Happy. My aisle-mates and I share humour both dark and light, swap happy stories about our family lives or commiserate as needed. And sometimes we just throw things at one another. Right in front of me sits another person who’s just about as geeky as me, poor thing. I’ll call my neighbour Simon, though that might be a fake name and even sex.

On the four-foot fabric panel wall that separates Simon’s back from my throwing arm rests a variety of toys. These are the kinds of things that accumulate in techie cube farms: stress balls, small wind-up toys, stuffed vendor mascots with screen-wipe behinds and so on. As Simon and I discuss the events of the day and week, we often play with these toys. Today we came up with a solution for Google’s inability to catch Apple in the race for mind- and market-share in the consumer electronics ecosystem market, especially when it comes to tablets and even now that it’s swallowed Motorola’s mobile devices unit. Happenstance, rather than necessity, was the mother of this invention.

So here it is! Read More »

When you get someone else to do something for you, that doesn’t mean it’s not being done, or that getting it done is not important, or even that you don’t have to worry about it any more. And when you get someone else to do something for you that’s critical to your business, you’re going to want to manage it carefully! Read More »

So there I was recently in a confidential vendor briefing being presented with an upcoming product that promises to be the Holy Grail to systems capacity planners for all platforms. It was an interesting session but it’s a good thing it was in the morning: after lunch I’d have been Quite Sleepy. Doesn’t matter really, except for one little piece of one particular slide, which reminded me, as often happens, that I’m Always Grumpy.

The slide in question used a bunch of little click-art people in various roles to illustrate how much better a place the world will be and for whom, once we all just buy the vendor’s product. There was the Capacity Manager and the Service Manager, and a bunch of other people. Second from the left was the Cloud Admin. “The what?” I practically shouted it aloud. Here’s what that little piece of that page of the presentation looked like: Read More »

This gem arrived in my poor, stuffed e-mail inbox the other day from our friends at IT World Canada, reminding me that I’m Always Grumpy:

Chief Mobile Officer: A job title now timely? With staff increasingly using smart phones and tablets, CIOs should urge their organizations to designate a CMO to create an enterprise mobile strategy, says Forrester.”

This is getting silly! Creating an enterprise mobile strategy is a job for a systems architect and her boss to do with approval from the real C-level execs. At this rate the most senior secretary (sorry!) will soon be the CAO, or Chief Admin-Assist Officer. If we take this suggestion, among the proliferation of C-level titles I offer the following: Read More »

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